UN expert: Demining of Mosul needs 10 years to multiply

UN expert: Demining of Mosul needs 10 years to multiply

2018/2/15 8:42

UN expert - Demining of Mosul needs 10 years to multiply[Oan- follow – up]
expert in the demining of the United Nations , said that unexploded bombs remain scattered in the city of Mosul for a decade, jeopardizing a million civilians or more want to return to their homeland after the end of the control Daesh of the city, which lasted three years.
The destruction of Mosul has left an estimated 11 million tonnes of debris and two thirds of the explosive materials are believed to be buried in rubble, said Per Ludhammer, program director at the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS).
“Our estimate is that the clearance of western Mosul will take more than a decade,” he told a news conference in Geneva. “The density and complexity of the explosive material will not allow this clearance to be completed within months or even years.”
“We see munitions dropped from the air, bombs weighing [one] 500 pounds dropped, penetrating the ground for a distance of 15 meters or more, just take one of them take days and sometimes weeks.”
Last year, the United Nations Mine Action Service removed 45,000 explosive ordnance and 750 improvised explosive devices throughout Iraq, including more than 25,000 in western Mosul alone.
Other areas such as Fallujah and Sinjar also need more support for demining efforts.
Last week, deminers discovered a factory for the production of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), with a large amount of mortars, artillery shells, grenades, rockets and 250,000 electronic components.
“It looked like a cyclone hit an electronics store,” Ludhamer said.
The removal of buildings such as the main hospital in western Mosul, which he had previously adopted, was vital to restore services to the citizens.
“We have removed more than 2,500 explosive items, from explosive belts to rocket-propelled grenades, mortars and hand grenades,” said Ludhammer. “Say what you want, all of it was there.”
At the Supreme Court in Mosul there were 44 suitcases and explosive belts, nine improvised explosive devices ready for detonation, 64 pieces of improvised explosive devices, 231 mortars, 48 ​​rockets, 72 improvised explosive devices, 220 grenades and 109 grenades.
After all that was done, piles of real estate documents were found, such as in support of returning citizens seeking legal ownership of their homes.
The manufacture of most improvised explosive devices was based on readily available components such as fertilizers, aluminum and diesel powder, and mine prevention valves.
The charges were placed at home or at regular intervals in belts up to 10 kilometers long, with an explosive charge planted every two meters, each containing between 10 and 20 kg of improvised explosive devices.
Some were so complex that they contained infrared sensors or armor-piercing charges.
“Initial explosive charges are nothing new,” Ludhamer said. “The new is how complex, densely populated, and they are. They have manufactured munitions and IEDs on an industrial scale. This is new, and they are also manufacturing conventional munitions.”

alliraqnews.com